Betelgeuse is a massive star, about 700 times bigger than our sun. If you dropped it into our solar system, it would swallow Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, the asteroid belts different worlds whole and Jupiter would wind up as a treat, too. And its coming to the end of its life process, sometime in the next 100,000 years. When the supergiant started to dim in 2015, there were some followers who thought the process of taking off might have started. A NASA graphic demonstrating how a dust cloud may obscure the view of Betelgeuse.
NASA/ESA/E. Wheatley (STScI).
By looking at Betelgeuse at UV wavelengths, scientists were able to get a better look at the stars surface and environment. About a month after the outburst, the south part of Betelgeuse dimmed conspicuously, she said.Dupree and her team think this product may have started to cool down as it moved through area, forming a thick dust cloud that partly obscured Betelgeuse. If it happened on the opposite side of Betelgeuse, we d likely never even know.Explosive outbursts are anticipated from stars at the end of their life and when they die or “go supernova,” they release a shockwave that gushes components into space.

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Betelgeuse is a massive star, about 700 times larger than our sun. By looking at Betelgeuse at UV wavelengths, scientists were able to get a better appearance at the stars surface area and environment. About a month after the outburst, the south part of Betelgeuse dimmed notably, she said.Dupree and her team think this material might have begun to cool down as it moved through space, forming a thick dust cloud that partially obscured Betelgeuse. If it occurred on the opposite side of Betelgeuse, we d likely never even know.Explosive outbursts are expected from stars at the end of their life and when they die or “go supernova,” they launch a shockwave that gushes aspects into area.

The dimming event happened just as Hubble researchers were looking to observe Betelgeuse with the telescope, supplying a possibility to understand why the star had started to go dark.

Betelgeuse will go supernova and take off … ultimately.
ESO
In the Before Times, when the coronavirus was only just starting its grim march across the world, our troubles were much further away. About 640 light-years farther away, in fact. Astronomers observing Betelgeuse, a red supergiant star, had been puzzled by its mysterious dimming. Some thought the event, which lasted from Nov. 2019 to Feb. 2020, was a portent of doom signalling the stars upcoming surge. Then the dimming quickly stopped.Thanks to observations by NASAs Hubble telescope, we may understand why.A brand-new study, published in The Astrophysical Journal on Thursday ( and accessible at arXiv), analyzed ultraviolet light given off by Betelgeuse during the “Great Dimming” event using the Hubble Space Telescope. Luckily, the dimming occasion took place just as Hubble researchers were seeking to observe Betelgeuse with the telescope, providing a possibility to comprehend why the star had actually started to go dark.

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