Californians should be prepared for rolling blackouts through Wednesday as a statewide heat wave strains the state’s electrical power grid, the California Independent System Operator said Sunday.California ISO, which monitors the state’s electricity needs and power grid capabilities, issued a warning at noon saying, it is “forecasting a possible system reserve deficiency” between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. “A persistent, record-breaking heat wave in California and the western states is causing a strain on supplies, and consumers should be prepared for likely rolling outages during the late afternoons and early evenings through Wednesday,” California ISO said in a statement. “There is not a sufficient amount of energy to meet the high amounts of demand during the heatwave.”The agency issued a Flex Alert, urging Californians to voluntary conserve electricity from 3 p.m. and 10 p.m.“Consumers can actively help by shifting energy use to morning and nighttime hours and conserving as much energy as possible during the late afternoon and evening hours,” the agency said. “Consumer conservation can help lower demand and avoid further actions including outages, and lessen the duration of an outage.”California ISO enacted rolling blackouts Friday evening, which was a first for the state since 2001. Blackouts were ordered again Saturday evening as temperatures reached 111 degrees in Sacramento.| MORE | California hasn’t seen rolling blackouts since 2001: Here’s what happened 19 years ago“The ISO recognizes that reducing energy use during the hot time of the day is a hardship, especially for those working from home or with children schooling at home,” California ISO said. “However, if a large number of consumers do their part in small ways, conservation can make a difference.” Pacific Gas & Electric also released a statement Sunday urging customers to conserve energy.“PG&E continues to urge customers to conserve energy as above-normal temperatures continue to dominate across the service area today and are expected to continue at least through the middle of the week,” the utility said in the statement. “Conservation is the best way customers can help prevent stress and strain on the electric supply that could lead to power outages for some electric customers.”PG&E said the novel coronavirus pandemic has made “heat-outage forecast more uncertain due to shifts in electric loads because more people are staying home all day.”PG&E outlined the following tips to save energy:Set the thermostat to 78 degrees when at home, health permittingTurn on a ceiling fan when using the air conditioner which will allow the thermostat to be raised about 4 degrees to save on cooling costs with no reduction in comfortUse shade coverings and awnings so the air conditioner won’t have to work as hard to cool the home.Avoid using the oven. Use the stove, microwave or outside grillLimit opening the fridge, which is a major electricity user in most homes

Californians should be prepared for rolling blackouts through Wednesday as a statewide heat wave strains the state’s electrical power grid, the California Independent System Operator said Sunday.

California ISO, which monitors the state’s electricity needs and power grid capabilities, issued a warning at noon saying, it is “forecasting a possible system reserve deficiency” between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.

“A persistent, record-breaking heat wave in California and the western states is causing a strain on supplies, and consumers should be prepared for likely rolling outages during the late afternoons and early evenings through Wednesday,” California ISO said in a statement. “There is not a sufficient amount of energy to meet the high amounts of demand during the heatwave.”

7-day forecast for Sunday, Aug. 16

The agency issued a Flex Alert, urging Californians to voluntary conserve electricity from 3 p.m. and 10 p.m.

“Consumers can actively help by shifting energy use to morning and nighttime hours and conserving as much energy as possible during the late afternoon and evening hours,” the agency said. “Consumer conservation can help lower demand and avoid further actions including outages, and lessen the duration of an outage.”

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California ISO enacted rolling blackouts Friday evening, which was a first for the state since 2001. Blackouts were ordered again Saturday evening as temperatures reached 111 degrees in Sacramento.

| MORE | California hasn’t seen rolling blackouts since 2001: Here’s what happened 19 years ago

“The ISO recognizes that reducing energy use during the hot time of the day is a hardship, especially for those working from home or with children schooling at home,” California ISO said. “However, if a large number of consumers do their part in small ways, conservation can make a difference.”

Pacific Gas & Electric also released a statement Sunday urging customers to conserve energy.

“PG&E continues to urge customers to conserve energy as above-normal temperatures continue to dominate across the service area today and are expected to continue at least through the middle of the week,” the utility said in the statement. “Conservation is the best way customers can help prevent stress and strain on the electric supply that could lead to power outages for some electric customers.”

PG&E said the novel coronavirus pandemic has made “heat-outage forecast more uncertain due to shifts in electric loads because more people are staying home all day.”

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

PG&E outlined the following tips to save energy:

  • Set the thermostat to 78 degrees when at home, health permitting
  • Turn on a ceiling fan when using the air conditioner which will allow the thermostat to be raised about 4 degrees to save on cooling costs with no reduction in comfort
  • Use shade coverings and awnings so the air conditioner won’t have to work as hard to cool the home.
  • Avoid using the oven. Use the stove, microwave or outside grill
  • Limit opening the fridge, which is a major electricity user in most homes

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